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More Problems people have with moto payments

POS SOFTWARE

MOTO payments are EFTPOS transactions where the payment card used is not present. It is often used for payments made over the phone.

 

 

For many of my clients, this is a major source of income.

Besides having higher fees than regular credit card transactions, they can also be trouble as yesterday one of my clients found out. As the card was not there when the transaction occurred when the customer complained, it was my client's responsibility to prove that the actual cardholder authorised this transaction, This was impossible to do. A chargeback was done. The transaction cancelled. The goods sent are lost.

The problem is that for many of my clients there is no alternation but to accept MOTO payments

If so here are some tips that the bank sent, that might help by giving you some warning signs, so I thought I would share them here:

  1. If the delivery address does not look right
  2. Overseas orders
  3. Orders from people claiming that they cannot be contacted
  4. If a transaction is big or has orders for large quantities of the same item that do not seem to fit.
  5. If the same person starts giving you in a short time many orders
  6. If the orders are required urgently

What can I say but be careful? Accepting MOTO payments is a business decision.

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How to Ensure Your Facebook Page Complies With the law

POS SOFTWARE

You may be responsible for libellous comments that people make on your shop Facebook page.  You can be in trouble as it is on your page, the Supreme Court New South Wales has decided here.

Actionable tips

Set up Blocking Words

When people include a word you've blocked in a post or comment on your Page, it won't appear on your Page.

a) To block words:

  1. Click Settings at the top of your Page.
  2. From General, click Page Moderation.
  3. Type the words you want to block, separated by commas. You'll need to add both the singular and plural forms of the word you want to block.

You use what I do this list here and import it as a CSV. 

Now Save Changes.

 

b) Profanity Filter

You can block different degrees of profanity from appearing on your Page. Facebook will then block the many reported offensive words and phrases by its community.

  1. Click Settings at the top of your Page.

  2. From General, click Profanity Filter.

  3. Select Strong.

Now Save Changes.

c) Now if such comments still come on your Facebook, then go into your Facebook page ASAP and delete them. According to the Supreme Court New South Wales, it must be done ASAP.

 

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Useful links for the JobKeeper payment accounting

POS SOFTWARE

 

Here is the ATO requirements for JobKeeper

For most of you, the big issue is the turnover test. You need to be 30% down on the same period last year. There appears to be no pattern, some of our clients are way over last years figures, and some are way down.

But if you are eligible, then you will need to set it up in your payroll system. Here are some useful links from the most popular payroll programs used by our clients.

MYOB

QUICKBOOKS

XERO

 

 

 

 

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Coronavirus

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On Google reviews

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It is a modern business nightmare. You put all this effort and money into your business, and suddenly you find your hard-earned reputation is attacked by some anonymous person online. 

We have had this problem. We were selected in the newsagency industry to do the trials of the new Australian government social security cards. Out of the blue, a whole lot of people suddenly attacked us clearly who were not clients of ours for what we are sure is political purposes.  Unfortunately, there is not a lot you can do here, this was my experience when I complained to google and yahoo on one of our competitors

So what do you do if a negative review appears that you consider false and damaging to your business reputation of the business?  

Well my advice is 

1) Is assume that they could be real and answer their complaint and state *nicely* that you do not know that person and you have doubts about the review and that you are more ready than ready to address and fix the problem.  

2) Ask Google to delete it which they probably will not.

There is a third alternative go to court.

Generally, I think it is a long shot as you need to get the actual identity of the reviewer and then you can sue them to get them to take it down and for damages. This I am sure will take a long time, be very expensive and by the time it gets to court who will care about a matter years old anyway.

However this is what one dentist in Northcote in Melbourne did, he took Google to the Federal court to get the name of the anonymous negative reviewer and won (maybe?) 

Google the court ruled has to give him the name of that person but it remains to be seen if Google will or can do this. Today with public WiFi, it may be impossible. Even if he gets what google thinks is the name, it may be impossible to sue the person. A case in Holland, I read about the courts let a person off as although he admited it was his account, what he claimed is that he did not do it and that someone else must have hacked into his account. 

I do believe that this matter needs to be addressed by Australian Law.

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"Better mac" when big organisations and small business collide

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I have seen this happen a few times when a big organisation and a small business collide. When the big organisation is the government, they sometimes talk a bit nicer (although not always sometimes they are incredibly rough). If you have not followed the story about "Better mac" what happened is a small burger shop "Burger head." released a burger that they called "Better mac."

It looks like an excellent burger which I am sure is very tasty.

Still, as you can see above, McDonald's did not like the name.

Although it could be argued that the name 'better mac' is different McDonald's burgers name, eg 'big mac'. Also that there is nothing deceptive about the name since I doubt that anyone could be tricked into buying a "better mac" thinking that they were buying a McDonald's burgers, still the burger shop decided in a smart move to cash in on the publicity and comply in changing the name.

I said smart as the amount of money now need for court action is huge and the problem is that in a big organisation, the guy that authorises the legal action does not pay for it. So if you are not careful, you could easily get into court. Once in a court system, it is like medical and doctors bills, it is very hard to get out. 

It is not just the financial hit of litigation that can be very damaging to a small business. There is also the matter of their legal fees if you lose plus there is also the time and energy that it takes off.

The other problem is that if you win, what do you win? Do you like doing business with companies that take people to court? Of course, if you lose, it can harm your business’s reputation too.

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Making your own NDA

POS SOFTWARE

Now and then, in business and sometimes other matters, you are requested to sign a Non Disclosure Agreement (NDA). 

My advice is to unchanged, refuse to sign them unless you have too.

Some companies will email you an NDA first and tell you in that email that the discussion is bound by this NDA, the legality or enforceability of this I do not know. 

However, sometimes you must sign it, and sometimes it is fair and reasonable that you do sign it. In most cases, there's nothing wrong with signing the offered NDA. It is likely not personal as many consider it a regular part of doing business, a sign of good faith.

Sometimes you need them too! 

If for example, you get a great idea in business and want to discuss it with a supplier of yours. You do not want them to spread it around, but you do want to talk to them about it, well that is what an NDA is designed to do. Another example might be that you have a client list, a company is going to do some marketing that should be useful for you but you do want your client list kept confidential so again an NDA can be useful. 

Some companies insist that their employees sign it if you work for the US President you need to sign three NDAs. 

Do they work and how much validity do they have, I am not sure but I think you are often better off with one than without one.

Having decided that you would like someone to sign it first and they agree to sign it then how do you get one? You probably do not want to spend money with a lawyer.

This is a problem I faced a short time ago. 

So I did a net search and discovered an Australian government site which supplies NDAs free here.

Fill in the form, and it creates an NDA for you, which you can edit. It appears to be fair and reasonable. You may consider using this. 

Note: I am not a lawyer, I do not pretend to be one, and you would be well advised to discuss this matter with a lawyer.

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POS Solutions submission to the ACCC on customer loyalty schemes

POS SOFTWARE

We were asked and did provide a submission in response to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s (ACCC) customer loyalty schemes draft report 

The final report is available here.

Unfortunately, the final report we feel tends to concentrate in our view on the large loyalty programs and ignore the problems that small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) have here.

Our concerns were several. The first one is that the demands for a privacy statement constitute a significant problem for SMB. These documents can be huge; for example, the Velocity Frequent Flyer Terms and Conditions is about 28,000 words while the Qantas Frequent Flyer Terms is over 20,000 words. Both documents would take over an hour just to read. The cost of producing such a document to an SMB is high, so we were happy that the commission did explicitly accept our solution that a standard privacy statement by appropriate industry organisations should be looked into.

On the other problems, we brought up that SMB would find it challenging to manage a loyalty program over many years the ACCC was silent, and we are disappointed with that. Let say, for example, an SMB business changes its computer system. Now we do not lockout our former customers but many of our competitors do lockout their former customers, I have seen them do it frequently. Many charge hefty fees to run reports on old data files.

A client of ours, asked a compititor of ours to run some reports from his old data. He was quoted $450/hour as he was an unsupported user. When he asked how long it would take, he was told it was unclear but as a punt about 5 hours but it could take longer.  

Now if there has been a change of ownership, this may involve an exchange of legal letters first, which costs a lot before the SMB business owner can get access to the information required, and this takes time. So if there is a dispute other this with either the customer and/or the former owner, it may be impossible to get the required information. The prospect and reality of fraud here are huge. 

One tip, I do feel is that if you are buying an SMB that uses a point-based loyalty program that you clear up this problem before taking over. 

 

 

 

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Insurance on your point of sale system.

POS SOFTWARE

 

Your point of sale system has value and needs to be considered in your business insurance policy. It does not take long for a thief or a fire for you to lose it.

In my experience, the major insurance companies, on cost give a very competitive insurance rate, but you need to be aware that often

Chancy in the sense that often for the most unexpected reasons. 

I have seen them reject claims and the person being insured get nothing. 

They rarely move quickly.

I have seen people being arguing over the settlement for a long time.  It is not a lot of fun when you have a $20,000 bill that you paid for an emergency installation, because you need to have a working computer system is still not reimbursed a year later.

They often do not pay all

Particularly with fraud when the numbers get very high the insurance companies pay only a percentage. Say on a $1 million dollar claim, the judge nominates you for a  10%  legal slap on wrist, well that will be to you $100,000 plus maybe legal fees which will not be reimbursed.

There are several points I would recommend that when getting your business policy you consider.

When getting your business policy you consider.

Physical damage

How much is it going to cost you to install and replace the damage? 

You need here to also consider portable business equipment, like your mobile phones and laptops.

Loss of business while it is being replaced

These costs can quickly add up.

If you offer services like phone cards, bill payments, etc, you may not be able to sell these products until the computers are up and running.

You may need more staff to do the ordering.to record sales, etc

Your VIP club which now on many of our sites is generating about 4% of their trade is off.

If you have a website, it may be affected too.

Then there is loss of goodwill.

Public, Products, Privacy etc. Liability

Here is a horror scenario that happened. A power spike caused a monitor to explode, which sent flying glass throughout the shop. Luckily it was after hours, and the shop was empty, but what would have happened if it was when the shop was open and busy?

Privacy laws and the consequences of breaking it are very scary. There are special policies for this too.

If your EFTPOS is hacked, you might be responsible click here. It would not take long, with skimming your EFTPOS to build up a fair bill. Say you do 40 a day, over six days = 240 EFTPOS transaction. Say $2,000 taken off each that is $500,000+ plus damages plus legal etc.

Miss use of your systems, have a read here.

This is all worth thinking about this when making your business insurance policy.

 

 

 

 

 

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Proof of purchase

POS SOFTWARE

In the point of sale software, there was a record of a purchase of an item by a customer unknown. A person who had no proof that they purchased that item, came in and showed that item and demanded a refund.  The store manager was very suspicious, and soon this started a debate of what exactly is required for proof of purchase.

As a rule for a person to exercise their rights for a refund, a replacement, repair, etc, for an item, they need some proof of purchase. The problem here is that under Australian Consumer Law, it is not described what sufficient proof of purchase is. What it state is that the person must be able to demonstrate that they did purchase that item reasonably. If they can that, then a store may be breaking the law if it denies them this right.

It does not have to be a receipt; for example, here is some example of what proof of purchase can be:

  1. A bank or credit card statement
  2. An agreement with the store, eg a lay-by note
  3. An email

One problem, I can see here is what happens with faded receipts, if I come into your store with essentially a blank sheet of paper, what would you do? If it was me, I would insist on some other evidence.

If you want to know more, click here.

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